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Disclaimer:
The LAPDonline.org® website has made reasonable efforts to provide an accurate translation. However, no automated or computerized translation is perfect and is not intended to replace human or traditional translation methods. The official text is the English version of the LAPDonline.org® website. If any questions arise concerning the accuracy of the information presented by the translated version of the website, please refer to the English edition of the website, which is the official version.

 
Hate Crime Circular
 
 
PURPOSE

The purpose of this circular is to standardize hate crime and hate incident information presented during community crime prevention meetings, and impart basic hate crime and hate incident information to members of the community. The circular also contains valuable and practical hate crime and hate incident opportunity reduction strategies, which were researched, developed, and compiled by the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), to assist community members reduce their risk and vulnerability to hate crime and hate incidents.

INTRODUCTION

The City of Los Angeles has a unique and culturally diverse population. Its residents represent nearly every culture, nationality, race and religion on earth. This diversity has significantly contributed to making Los Angeles the vibrant and dynamic City it is today. Unfortunately, there are people and groups who would attack this heritage by committing crimes and acts, targeting members of specific groups that help make our City diverse. These crimes and acts that target members of a specific group are called hate crimes and hate incidents. Hate crimes and hate incidents are motivated by prejudice. Prejudice is a serious social problem. Prejudice means having beliefs and making judgments without knowing the facts. Prejudice is also known as bias, bigotry and intolerance. It is important to know the facts about hate crimes and hate incidents, because knowing the facts places the community in a much better position to recognize hate crimes and hate incidents as a very serious community problem. Hate crimes and hate incidents should never be written off as pranks or bad behavior.

HATE CRIME

A hate crime is any criminal act or attempted criminal act directed against a person or persons based on the victim’s actual or perceived race, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, disability or gender.

Examples of hate crimes include:
  • Acts which result in injury, even if the injury is slight.
  • Threats of violence that looks like they can be carried out.
  • Acts which result in property damage.
  • Any criminal act or attempted criminal act, including property damage, directed against public or private agencies.
HATE INCIDENTS

Hate incidents are similar to hate crimes in that the act is directed against a person or persons based on the victim’s actual or perceived race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, political affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or position in a labor dispute. The difference between a hate incident and a hate crime is that a hate incident is not a criminal act. Examples of hate incidents include:
  1. Offensive materials such as hate flyers placed in mailboxes or thrown on lawns.
  2. Hate materials, not resulting in property damage, such as demeaning caricatures depicting a racial, ethnic or a religious group.
  3. Hate graffiti in public places not directed against a specific target such as an epithet on a vacant building.
WHO ARE THE PEOPLE BEHIND HATE CRIMES?

All kinds of people, from all segments of our society commit hate crimes and participate in hate incidents. They include:
  • Individuals acting on their own.
  • Certain young people who may be out seeking thrills or to shock other community members.
  • Members of organized groups that promote hatred and racism.
  • Both majority and minority group members commit and are victims of hate crimes.
WHY DO PEOPLE COMMIT HATE CRIMES?

People who commit hate crimes or are involved in hate incidents have many objectives, all of which are destructive. These objectives include the following:
  • They wish to establish separate states based on race or ethnic origin.
  • They wrongly blame other groups for social problems, including crime, high taxes and unemployment.
  • They believe racial bloodlines should not mix. Some wish to create a pure race through genetic engineering.
  • They believe their own group should have the advantage in areas such as employment, housing and religious practices.
  • Hate crimes and involvement in hate incidents serve as an outlet for their personal rage and anger.
HATE CRIME VICTIMS

The victims of hate crime and hate incidents may be singled out because of the following:
  • Hate crimes and hate incidents are frequently directed at nonwhites, however, whites are victims too. Targets most often include African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and people from the Middle East.
  • Some people are victimized because of their country of origin.
  • Other victims are singled out because of their religious or political beliefs.
  • Gays and lesbians are also victimized because of their sexual orientation.
  • Violence and discrimination against women is often a result of the mistaken view that women are inferior to men.
  • People who have AIDS, or who are physically or mentally disabled are harassed or discriminated against because of their condition.
HATRED HURTS EVERYONE!

The victims, their families and friends can suffer serious personal, financial, and emotional losses, as a result of a hate crime or a hate incident. Hate crime and hate incidents can divide neighborhoods and communities by raising levels of fear and suspicion, and lowering openness and cooperation. Hate crimes, hate incidents and racist behaviors are direct threats to the principles of democracy and equality. People who are involved in hate crimes and hate incidents are often unhappy, easily swayed and mixed-up emotionally. Many have had few, if any, successes in life. Bias, bigotry, intolerance and participation in hate crime and hate incidents serve as an outlet for their frustrations. They are easily taken in by the persuasive talk of hate groups. Their involvement in hate prevents them from meeting new challenges and taking positive steps toward leading more productive and fulfilling lives.

WHAT HAS BEEN DONE?

The LAPD has long recognized the serious nature of crimes and incidents motivated by hatred and is one of the first law enforcement agencies in the nation to establish specialized procedures for the handling of hate crimes and hate incidents. In addition to a designated LAPD Hate Crime Coordinator of the rank of Commander, detectives are also designated as hate crime coordinators in each of the geographic Area Community Police Stations of the LAPD. In 1997, the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners established a Hate Crimes Task Force consisting of members of the LAPD and representatives from community organizations such as the Asian Pacific Legal Center, Anti-Defamation League, Gay and Lesbian Services Center and the Simon Wiesenthal Center. The task force members focused on the need to revise hate crime procedures, including the need to raise the level of command accountability within the ranks of the LAPD.

WHAT CAN BE DONE?

Hate crimes can be prosecuted either as misdemeanors (lesser offenses) or felonies (more serious offenses), depending on the severity of the acts committed. Hate crimes can be prosecuted, and hate incidents are tracked by the LAPD. Hate crimes and hate incidents not only affect the victim they affect all of society. Hate crimes and hate incidents strike at the very heart of our society. Our country, constitution, and national character are based on tolerance and respect for the rights and needs of the individual. Hate crimes and hate incidents directly attack those founding principles, breeding fear, distrust and uncertainty in the community. Historically, hate crimes have been underreported; thus, many are not prosecuted. The LAPD, Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office, Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Attorney’s Office are committed to apprehending and prosecuting perpetrators of hate crimes and preventing hate incidents.

RESPECT DIVERSITY!

Respect diversity at work and in your community. The more you learn and know about different cultures and traditions the richer your life will be. It is also important to work with children to dispel racist myths. Seize opportunities to counter bigoted views, for example, when they arise in news stories or television programs or when someone tells an ethnic joke. Additionally, support the efforts of the community to fight hate crimes and hate incidents through programs and projects on cultural diversity, human relations and conflict resolution. Promote the sharing of cultural events and holidays.

PERSONAL SECURITY

For information on personal security, please visit our Web site and go to Crime Prevention Tips, and go to the circular entitled personal security.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

The California Penal Code Section 422.6 (a) states the following:

"No person, whether or not acting under color of law, shall by force or threat of force, willfully injure, intimidate, interfere with, oppress, or threaten any other person in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him or her by the Constitution or laws of this state or by the Constitution or laws of the United States because of the other person’s race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, gender, or sexual orientation, or because he or she perceives that the other person has one or more of those characteristics"

The California Civil Code Section 51.7 states the following:

"All persons within the jurisdiction of this State have the right to be free from any violence, or intimidation by threat of violence, committed against their persons or property because of their race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, political affiliation, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, or position in a labor dispute. Anyone who violates the right provided by Section 51.7 is liable for each and every offense for the actual damages suffered by any person determined by a court of law. Damages shall be paid by the offender to the victim as follows:
  1. Up to a maximum of three times the amount of the actual damages.
  2. A civil penalty of ten thousand dollars.
  3. The attorney’s fee, as may be determined by the court.
WHAT REMEDIES ARE AVAILABLE?

Victims of hate crime may be eligible for some crime related losses through the California Victim Compensation Program, including:
  • Medical treatment;
  • Psychological counseling; and
  • Relocaton
For information call:  Los Angeles County District Attorney's Victim-Witness Assistance Program at 213-974-7499 or 800-380-3811.

Anyone who has had monetary or property loss because of the criminal act of another has the right to sue them for those monetary losses.  If you are considering filing a civil lawsuit, you should contact a civil attorney right away.

IF YOU ARE A VICTIM OF A HATE CRIME
  • Call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest LAPD community police station.
  • Contact any of the organizations listed in this circular.
IF YOU HAVE KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE PERPETRATOR OF A HATE CRIME

You are encouraged to contact the LAPD toll free hotline or the We Tip Hotline. Public cooperation is often essential in solving hate crimes.
  • LAPD Toll Free Hotline (877) LAWFULL (877-529-3835)
  • We Tip Hotline 909-987-5005

Los Angeles Police Crime Hate Crime Coordinators:

Hate Crime Coordinator 213-996-1390

77th Street Area
7600 South Broadway
Los Angeles 90003
213-485-4175

Central Area
251 E. 6th Street
Los Angeles 90014
213-972-1200

Devonshire Area
10250 Etiwanda Avenue
Northridge 91325
818-832-0609

Foothill Area
12760 Osborne Street
Pacoima 91331
818-834-3115

Harbor Area
2175 John Gibson Blvd.
San Pedro 90731
310-726-7900

Hollenbeck Area
2111 E. 1st Street
Los Angeles 90033
323-342-8901

Hollywood Area
1358 N. Wilcox Avenue
Hollywood 90028
213-972-2967

Mission Area
11121 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
Mission Hills 91345
818-838-9810

Newton Area
3400 S. Central Avenue
Los Angeles 90011
323-846-5363

Northeast Area
3353 San Fernando Road
Los Angeles 90065
213-485-2566

North Hollywood Area
11640 Burbank Boulevard
North Hollywood 91601
818-623-4045

Olympic Area
1130 S. Vermont Ave.
Los Angeles 90006
213-382-9450

Pacific Area
12312 Culver Boulevard
Los Angeles 90066
310-482-6313

Rampart Area
1401 West 6th St.
Los Angeles 90017
213-484-3450

Southeast Area
145 W. 108th Street
Los Angeles 90061
213-972-7813

Southwest Area
1546 W. Martin Luther King Blvd.
Los Angeles 90062
213-486-6571

Topanga Area
21501 Schoenborn St.
Canoga Park 91304
818-756-4820

Van Nuys Area
6240 Sylmar Avenue
Van Nuys 91401
818-374-0040

West Los Angeles Area
1663 Butler Avenue
Los Angeles 90066
310-444-1580

West Valley Area
19020 Vanowen Street
Reseda 91335
818-374-7730

Wilshire Area
4861 W. Venice Boulevard
Los Angeles 90019
213-922-8205

PROSECUTION AGENCIES

  • Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office
    Special Enforcement Office 213-485-5030
  • Los Angeles County District Attorney
    Hate Crimes Division 213-974-3798
  • U. S. Attorney’s Office
    Civil Rights Unit 213-894-5872
  • ADDITIONAL ORGANIZATIONS THAT MAY BE ABLE TO HELP YOU   

    • Anti-Defamation League 800-446-2684 or 310-446-8000
    • Asian Pacific American Legal Center
      (English, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog and Vietnamese languages spoken) 213-977-7500
    • Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
      (Spanish and English languages spoken) 213-353-1333
    • Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) 213-626-4471
    • L. A. Gay and Lesbian Center Anti-Violence Project 800-373-2227 or 323-993-7676
    • Los Angeles Urban League 323-299-9660
    • Simon Wiesenthal Center 310-553-8403
    • Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC) 213-383-3443
    • National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) 323-296-2630
    • Southern Christian Leadership Conference
      and Martin Luther King Legacy Association 323-295-8582
    GOVERNMENT AGENCIES
    • Los Angeles City Commission on Disabilities 213-485-5129
    • Los Angeles City Human Relations Commission 213-978-1660
    • Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities 213-974-1053
    • Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission 213-974-7611

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR FIGHTING HATE CRIME AND HATE INCIDENTS

    COMMUNITY RELATIONS SECTION

    The LAPD Community Relations Section (CRS) has a clear role in the fight against hate crime and hate incidents in the City of Los Angeles. In fact, the CRS was created in the aftermath of the Watts riots of 1965. The creation of CRS was based on the recognition by the LAPD of the need for a mutual understanding and constant interchange between the LAPD and the many diverse communities it protects and serves. The initial goals were unification of the LAPD effort to consolidate and broaden community support and to assist local LAPD community police station commanding officers in maintaining channels of communication with minorities throughout the City of Los Angeles. The LAPD believed then and believes now that by engaging minority communities in meaningful dialogue, problems between the community and the LAPD, which contribute to social unrest and major confrontations, could be avoided.

    The CRS is dedicated to reducing hate crime and hate incidents in the City of Los Angeles. To accomplish this task the CRS maintains contact with community-based organizations, leaders, spokespersons, and other sources and resources to develop and keep open the lines of communications between the Chief of Police and those groups or individuals. The CRS maintains a constant interchange of communication with the public in order to monitor emerging hate crime trends, hate incidents and tensions within the community, and remains available to take positive action to avert any situations that could be damaging to community members. The CRS is dedicated to maintain a tranquil, hate crime and hate incident free environment in the City and to foster mutual trust and respect between the LAPD and the community. The CRS may be reached at 213-485-4101 or Faxed at 213-847-3518. The CRS performs the following services:

    • Providing orientation for LAPD recruit officers regarding community relations issues at the Los Angeles Police Academy.
    • Coordinating quarterly meetings between the Chief of Police and various community forums such as, Asian/Pacific Islanders, Hispanic, African American, Gay and Lesbian, Youth and Clergy from throughout the City.
    • Conducting community surveys periodically in selected areas to determine levels of satisfaction with LAPD services.
    • Attending community meetings throughout the City as representatives of the Chief of Police.
    • Coordinating quarterly community relations meetings throughout the City.
    • Serving as the official LAPD liaison with the Gay and Lesbian community.
    • Responding to the scene of high profile incidents, such as law enforcement related deaths or major confrontations between the LAPD and the public in order to have a proactive role in quelling rumors and misinformation and the dissemination of factual information to the public.
    • Continuously striving to maintain open channels of communication between the numerous and diverse communities and the LAPD, in an ongoing and focused effort to keep abreast of the contemporary issues facing the LAPD today and in the future.
    • Coordinating town hall meetings throughout the City.

    COMMUNITY LIAISON/CRIME PREVENTION UNIT

    On June 25, 1927, the LAPD established the first fully budgeted Crime Prevention Division (CPD) in the City of Los Angeles. Under the present LAPD Administration the former CPD is part of the CRS and is called the Community Liaison/Crime Prevention Unit (CL/CPU). The CL/CPU works closely with CRS and numerous other entities inside and outside the LAPD to fight hate crime and hate incidents. For instance, the CL/CPU is responsible for the development of this circular and many other community crime prevention circulars, brochures, videos and other crime prevention programs and strategies focused on reducing criminal opportunity. The CL/CPU also maintains the Crime Prevention Resource Center (CPRC), headquartered at the Police Administration Building (PAB). The CPRC contains a variety of crime prevention videos and brochures and other crime prevention resources available to the community. The CL/CPU also prepares crime prevention messages for broadcasting in local radio and television programs and crime prevention articles for publication in local magazines and newspapers. The personnel assigned to the CL/CPU are dedicated to reducing fear, hate crime and hate motivated incidents and improving the quality of life in the City of Los Angeles. The CL/CPU may be reached at 213-485-3134 or faxed at 213-847-6009.

    LAPDONLINE UNIT

    The LAPD has developed the largest and most comprehensive Web site to promote public safety, reduce hate crime, hate crime incidents and to provide frequently requested information to all those who live, work, and visit in the City of Los Angeles. One of the many benefits of having a Web site is that the LAPD can reach not only those in the Los Angeles area but around the globe as well. With over 30,000 pages of information online and more than 300 LAPD publications available for the public to download, LAPDOnline now stands as the premier law enforcement Web site in the world. Since its inception, LAPDOnline has consistently garnered over 350,000 hits per day or over nine million hits per month. You can access the LAPD Web site on the Internet at www.lapdonline.org. The LAPDOnline Unit may be reached at 213-486-5940 or faxed at 213-486-6080 or e-mail: contact.lapdonline@gmail.com.

    CONCLUSION

    The hate crime and hate incident information and opportunity reduction strategies contained in this circular was compiled from research material and information obtained from the following sources:

    As a covered entity under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the City of Los Angeles does not discriminate on the basis of disability and, upon request, will provide reasonable accommodation to ensure equal access to its programs, services, and activities. This circular may be requested in accessible format.

     
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