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Disclaimer:
The LAPDonline.org® website has made reasonable efforts to provide an accurate translation. However, no automated or computerized translation is perfect and is not intended to replace human or traditional translation methods. The official text is the English version of the LAPDonline.org® website. If any questions arise concerning the accuracy of the information presented by the translated version of the website, please refer to the English edition of the website, which is the official version.

 
1999 Medal of Valor Recipients
 
 
Police Officer Andrew Azodi
Police Officer Jude Bella
Former Police Officer Ryan Clark
Police Officer John Constable
Police Officer Ossie Crenshaw
Police Officer Chris Dunn
Police Officer James Edwards
Reserve Officer Debra Fairchild
Police Officer Kevin Foster
Police Officer Craig Hewitt
Police Officer Bruce Hunt
Police Officer Joseph Kalyn
Police Officer Jack Parker
Police Officer David Rodriguez
Police Officer James Veenstra
Police Officer Louis Villalobos
Police Officer Rex Yap
Police Officer Chris Yzaguirre




Police Officer Jack Parker

On Sunday, April 6, 1995, off-duty Metropolitan Division Officer Jack Parker and an off-duty Traffic Coordination Section Reserve Officer were driving their personal vehicles in the Van Nuys Area.

At an intersection, both officers stopped and observed a group of men fighting near a bar. Suddenly, one of the men produced a semi-automatic handgun and began firing at the group, wounding one victim. The suspect then fled.

In an attempt to stop the assault, both officers exited their vehicles and identified themselves as police officers. Armed with an off-duty revolver, Officer Parker attempted to locate the suspect. Suddenly, the suspect fired on Officer Parker. Despite the intense gunfire, Officer Parker kept the suspect in sight as he fled in a vehicle driven by an accomplice.

Officer Parker instructed the Reserve Officer to follow the fleeing vehicle. After stopping twice, the suspects exited the vehicle and fled on foot.

Officer Parker continued his pursuit on foot, and despite falling and sustaining injuries to his knees and hand, continued to chase the suspect.

Maintaining his cool mind, Parker tactically positioned himself to avoid being ambushed by the two suspects. With the assistance of the Reserve Officer, the suspects were apprehended.

Officer Jack Parker’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Parker is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Reserve Police Officer Debra Fairchild

On Sunday, April 16, 1995, off-duty Traffic Coordination Section Reserve Officer Debra Fairchild and an off-duty Metropolitan officer were driving their personal vehicles in the Van Nuys Area.

At an intersection both officers stopped and observed a group of men fighting near a bar. Suddenly one of the men produced a handgun and fired several rounds at the group, and then fled.

Realizing the danger the suspect posed to the community, both officers exited their vehicles, and attempted to locate him. Though not authorized to carry a weapon, Officer Fairchild placed herself in harm’s way, and immediately joined the armed Metropolitan officer in the pursuit. Suddenly, the suspect fired at the Metropolitan officer, and then fled in a vehicle driven by an accomplice.

Working as a team, both officers followed the suspects. Officer Fairchild turned on her high-beam headlights so as to read the license plate numbers. The suspect fired on Officer Fairchild, narrowly missing her. After stopping the vehicle twice, the suspect and his accomplice then exited the vehicle and fled on foot.

As the Metropolitan officer began a foot pursuit of the suspects, Officer Fairchild exited her vehicle and joined the pursuit. Both officers chased the suspects for two blocks. The suspects were apprehended by the Metropolitan officer and Officer Fairchild, who though unarmed, did not hesitate to bring a dangerous armed suspect into custody.

Reserve Officer Debra Fairchild’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Parker is hereby acknowledged by awarding her the Medal of Valor.



Police Officer Chris Dunn

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

West Valley Patrol Officer Chris Dunn was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Dunn and other patrol officers met with the partner of the wounded Glendale detective who briefed them on the location of his injured partner. The officers immediately initiated a rescue plan and began implementation. The officers rolled a flashlight into the darkened warehouse causing the suspect to fire one round, striking the flashlight. Officer Dunn returned cover fire as the rescue team retreated to a safer location. The rescue attempt was discontinued and SWAT officers were requested to respond to the scene.

The SWAT unit deployed and rescued the Glendale detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Chris Dunn’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Dunn is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Joseph Kalyn

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

West Valley Patrol Officer Joseph Kalyn was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Kalyn and other patrol officers met with the partner of the wounded Glendale detective who briefed them on the location of his injured partner. The officers immediately initiated a rescue plan and began implementation. The officers rolled a flashlight into the darkened warehouse causing the suspect to fire one round, striking the flashlight. Officer Kalyn returned cover fire as the rescue team retreated to a safer location. The rescue attempt was discontinued and SWAT officers were requested to respond to the scene.

The SWAT unit deployed and rescued the detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Joseph Kalyn’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Kalyn is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.


Police Officer Chris Yzaguirre

On May 27, 1997, Foothill Patrol Officer Chris Yzaguirre and other officers responded to an "Officer Down" radio call.

The officers arrived at a warehouse where an armed domestic violence suspect had shot and seriously injured a Glendale Police detective. An initial attempt to rescue the injured detective proved unsuccessful. Realizing that there would be a delay in Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) response, Officer Yzaguirre formulated a plan to rescue the fallen detective. Eight officers were deployed for the mission; four officers would rescue the detective, with Yzaguirre and three others providing cover.

After the cover team fired three rounds in the direction of the hidden suspect, the rescuers moved into the warehouse. The suspect returned fire and hit two officers in the rescue team. The wounded officers were evacuated and later received medical treatment. During the rescue, Officer Yzaguirre displayed quick and resourceful thinking in a dangerous situation by devising and implementing a rescue plan. He also demonstrated uncommon courage in providing cover to the rescue officers.

Officer Chris Yzaguirre’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Yzaguirre is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Craig Hewitt

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

Devonshire Patrol Officer Craig Hewitt was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Hewitt and other officers determined that the suspect had barricaded himself inside the darkened warehouse, waiting to ambush any rescuing officers. Concerned with the condition of the wounded Glendale detective, SWAT officers were then requested to respond to the scene.

Realizing there would be a delay in the SWAT officers’ arrival, the officers initiated a plan to rescue the Glendale detective. Officer Hewitt and another officer fired three shotgun rounds in the direction of the suspect, while the rescue team entered the warehouse. The suspect then fired several rounds injuring two of the rescuing officers. Immediately, Officer Hewitt deployed into a position providing cover for the wounded officers, allowing several other officers to pull the wounded officers to safety.

The SWAT unit arrived, deployed and rescued the Glendale detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Craig Hewitt’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Hewitt is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer John Constable

On May 27, 1997, Van Nuys Patrol Officer John Constable and other officers responded to an "Officer Down" radio call.

The officers arrived at a warehouse where an armed suspect had shot and seriously injured a Glendale Police Department Officer. Five officers met with the Detective’s partner for a quick briefing of the situation. The primary objective was to remove the Detective from the warehouse. Due to the darkness in the warehouse, the officers rolled a flashlight in the general area where the Detective fell. The suspect immediately fired a round, striking the flashlight. Faced with a life –threatening situation, the officers retreated and requested Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT)’s help. Realizing every second counted as the Detective lay wounded, the officers devised a rescue plan. The plan called for four officers, including Officer Constable, to provide cover so that four others could remove the wounded Detective. As two members of the cover team fired three rounds in the direction of the hidden suspect, the rescuers moved into the warehouse. The advancing officers were met with gunfire. The suspect’s bullets hit two police officers. The wounded officers were later evacuated to safety and transported to a hospital. During the gunfire, Officer Constable exhibited uncommon courage, providing cover for the evacuation of the wounded officers.

Officer John Constable’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Constable is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Kevin Foster

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

West Valley Patrol Officer Kevin Foster was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Foster and other officers determined that the suspect had barricaded himself inside the darkened warehouse, waiting to ambush any rescuing officers. Concerned with the condition of the wounded Glendale detective, SWAT officers were then requested to respond to the scene.

Realizing there would be a delay in the SWAT officers’ arrival, the officers initiated a plan to rescue the Glendale detective. With several other officers providing cover, Officer Foster and the rescue team entered the warehouse. The suspect then fired several rounds striking Officer Foster and another rescuing officer. Although Officer Foster’s body armor prevented any fatal injuries, he sustained several gunshot wounds from the suspect’s deadly barrage. Immediately, the rescue and cover teams regrouped and pulled Officer Foster and the other wounded rescuing officer to safety.

The SWAT unit arrived, deployed and rescued the Glendale detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Kevin Foster’s courage, bravery and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Foster is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Jude Bella

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

West Valley Patrol Officer Jude Bella was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Bella and other officers determined that the suspect had barricaded himself inside the darkened warehouse, waiting to ambush any rescuing officers. Concerned with the condition of the wounded Glendale detective, SWAT officers were then requested to respond to the scene.

Realizing there would be a delay in the SWAT officers’ arrival, the officers initiated a plan to rescue the Glendale detective. With several other officers providing cover, Officer Bella and the rescue team entered the warehouse. The suspect then fired several rounds striking Officer Bella and another rescuing officer. Although Officer Bella’s body armor prevented any fatal injuries, he sustained a total of five gunshot wounds from the suspect’s deadly barrage. Immediately the rescue and cover teams regrouped and pulled Officer Bella and the other wounded rescuing officer to safety.

The SWAT unit arrived, deployed and rescued the Glendale detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Jude Bella’s courage, bravery and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Bella is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Andrew Azodi

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

West Valley Patrol Officer Andrew Azodi was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Azodi and other officers determined that the suspect had barricaded himself inside the darkened warehouse, waiting to ambush any rescuing officers. Concerned with the condition of the wounded Glendale detective, SWAT officers were then requested to respond to the scene.

Realizing there would be a delay in the SWAT officers’ arrival, the officers initiated a plan to rescue the Glendale detective. With several other officers providing cover, Officer Azodi and the rescue team entered the warehouse. The suspect then fired several rounds injuring two of the rescuing officers. Immediately, Officer Azodi redeployed to a safe location. The rescue and cover teams regrouped and Officer Azodi provided cover fire allowing several others to pull the wounded officers to safety.

The SWAT unit arrived, deployed and rescued the Glendale detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Andrew Azodi’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Azodi is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer James Veenstra

On the evening of May 27, 1997, Metropolitan Division Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Officer James Veenstra became involved in a gunfight with a violent domestic violence suspect.

The suspect had previously opened fire on two Glendale Detectives who were trying to locate him as part of a domestic violence investigation. A tip led the Detectives to a warehouse. As the Detectives entered the building, they were met with semi-automatic gunfire, causing one of the Detectives to fall wounded from his injury.

Previous rescue attempts by LAPD responding units did not extract the downed Detective and resulted in gunshot wounds to several officers. Officer Veenstra and his SWAT unit deployed into two teams: one to provide cover, and the other to rescue the Glendale Detective.

With the plan in place, SWAT officers fired a noise-flash diversionary device into the warehouse. The rescue team courageously entered and positioned themselves at the Detectives side. Officer Veenstra and his team members covered the rescue team, effectively suppressing the suspect’s fire and enabling the officers to retrieve the Glendale Officer, who was now deceased due to his injuries. The SWAT unit redeployed to search for the suspect, who ended the stand- off with a fatal self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Officer James Veenstra’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Veenstra is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Bruce Hunt

On the evening of May 27, 1997, Metropolitan Division Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Officer Bruce Hunt became involved with a gunfight with a domestic violence suspect.

The suspect had previously opened fire on two Glendale detectives, wounding one, in a warehouse. A subsequent attempt by LAPD officers to rescue the Glendale detective resulted in more officers being shot.

Officer Hunt and his SWAT unit deployed into two teams: one to provide cover for the rescue team, and the other to extract the Glendale detective.

The SWAT unit deployed into a rescue and cover team. The plan involved a noise-flash diversionary device. As the suspect fired at the officers, the rescue team quickly deployed around the downed Detective, who unknown to the officers, had succumbed to his wounds. Officer Hunt and the cover team successfully returned fire, enabling the rescue team to complete their mission. The officer joined the SWAT unit, who was now redeployed to apprehend the suspect. They found the sniper, who ended the incident by firing a fatal self-inflicted gunshot would.

Officer Bruce Hunt’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Hunt is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Louis Villalobos

On the evening of May 27, 1997, Metropolitan Division Special Weapons and Tactics Officer Louis Villalobos was deployed to a studio prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

At the location, a violent domestic violence suspect had fired on two Glendale Detectives who were trying to locate the suspect. The suspect, who had held LAPD responding units at bay, was preventing officers from entering the building to retrieve the downed Detective.

After a briefing, Officer Villalobos and his SWAT unit members employed a plan, which would deploy diversionary noise-flash tactics so that one team would provide cover so the second team could locate and retrieve the downed Detective.

The suspect, unrelenting in his attack on the officers, fired at Officer Villalobos and his rescue team member as they positioned themselves at the site of the wounded Detective. The cover team returned effective suppressive fire while Officer Villalobos and the rescue team extracted the Glendale Detective, who had succumbed to his wounds.

Officer Louis Villalobos’ courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Villalobos is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Ossie Crenshaw

On the evening of May 27, 1997, Metropolitan Division Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Officer Ossie Crenshaw was called to the location of a studio prop warehouse.

At the location, a domestic violence suspect had fired on two Glendale detectives, wounding one of them. A subsequent attempt to rescue the Glendale detective by LAPD officers resulted in more officers being shot.

After a briefing, Officer Crenshaw and his SWAT unit members executed a plan using diversionary noise-flash tactics, followed by the entry of a rescue and cover team.

The suspect, unrelenting in his attack on the officers, fired at Officer Crenshaw and his rescue team member as they positioned themselves at the site of the wounded detective. The cover team returned effective suppressive fire, enabling the rescue team to extract the Glendale detective, who had succumbed to his fatal wounds. After retrieving the detective, the SWAT team redeployed to search for the suspect, who ended the standoff with a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Officer Ossie Crenshaw’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Crenshaw is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer David Rodriguez

On May 27, 1997, after hearing a report of an "officer down" call involving two Glendale Police Detectives, LAPD Officers from several Areas responded to the scene.

A domestic violence suspect ambushed the two Glendale Detectives in a studio prop warehouse. Upon entering the warehouse, LAPD officers were met with a barrage of semi-automatic gunfire, seriously wounding one Detective who could not exit the warehouse.

Metropolitan Division’s Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Officer David Rodriguez was called out to the scene. The officers were mobilized to rescue the downed Glendale Detective and apprehend the suspect, after two previous unsuccessful rescue attempts resulted in several LAPD officers sustaining gunshot wounds.

Deploying diversionary flash-noise devices, the officers were able to enter the building. The wounded Glendale Detective was located; however, his body size made it difficult for the two SWAT officers to extract him. Officer Rodriguez then made entry into the building and the team successfully extracted the Detective, who had succumbed from his wounds.

Officer David Rodriguez’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Rodriguez is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Former Police Officer Ryan Clark

On the evening of May 27, 1997, a suspect in a domestic violence investigation had opened fire on two Glendale Police detectives, seriously wounding one, at a studio-prop warehouse in the San Fernando Valley.

North Hollywood Patrol Officer Ryan Clark was one of the first officers to respond. Officer Clark and other officers determined that the suspect had barricaded himself inside the darkened warehouse, waiting to ambush any rescuing officers. Concerned with the condition of the wounded Glendale detective, SWAT officers were then requested to respond to the scene.

Realizing there would be a delay in the SWAT officers’ arrival, the officers initiated a plan to rescue the Glendale detective. With several other officers providing cover, Officer Clark and the rescue team entered the warehouse. The suspect then fired several rounds injuring two of the rescuing officers. Immediately, Officer Clark redeployed to a safe location. The rescue and cover teams regrouped and Officer Clark provided cover fire allowing several others to pull the wounded officers to safety.

The SWAT unit arrived, deployed and rescued the Glendale detective, who unfortunately had succumbed to his injuries. The SWAT unit then searched for the suspect, and found his body with a fatal, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

Officer Ryan Clark’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Clark is hereby acknowledged with the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer James Edwards

On January 17, 1997, Northeast Patrol Division Community Resources Against Street Hoodlums (CRASH) Officer James Edwards and his two partners responded to a radio call requesting additional units to respond to a gang-related assault investigation.

After arriving at the location, they heard gunfire. Attempting to locate the source of the gunfire, they observed a group of male gang members. As the officers approached, the suspects fled. Minutes later, Officer Edwards and his partners came upon another group of males, who were spraying graffiti onto a wall. One of the males’ clothing was similar to that of the outstanding armed assault suspect, leading the officers to investigate further.

Suddenly, one of the suspects turned and pointed a gun at the officers as they exited the vehicle. Officer Edwards alerted his partners by shouting "Gun!" But the suspect turned and fired, striking one officer in the face. Taking cover, Officer Edwards engaged the suspect and fired his weapon.

His partner’s life in peril, Officer Edwards exposed himself to the line of fire and courageously lifted and carried his wounded partner to safety, while turning his head up to avoid further loss of blood. As another suspect began taking position to fire on the officers, Officer Edwards began moving parallel to the suspect. He identified himself as a police officer and ordered the suspect to put down his weapon; instead, the suspect fired at Officer Edwards. Officer Edwards then returned fire, causing the suspect to flee.

Realizing that the wounded officer was in dire need of medical treatment, Officer Edwards returned to the squad car and summoned paramedics. Despite the wounded Officer’s severe head trauma, Officer Edwards remained calm, and was able to direct responding units and helped in the apprehension of the armed suspects.

Officer James Edward’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Edwards is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Police Officer Rex Yap

On January 17, 1997, Northeast Patrol Division Community Resources Against Street Hoodlums (CRASH) Officer Rex Yap and his two partners were monitoring a radio broadcast from another CRASH unit requesting additional units to respond to a gang-related assault investigation.

After arriving at the location, they heard gunfire. As they attempted to locate the source of the gunfire, they observed a group of male gang members. When the officers approached, the suspects fled between houses and out of the officers’ line of sight.

Minutes later, the officers came upon several males at a nearby street intersection. Officer Yap noticed one of the males spraying graffiti on a retaining wall. One of the suspect’s clothing closely matched those of the outstanding armed suspect.

As the officers moved in to investigate, one of the suspects pointed a gun at the officers.

Suddenly, a shot pierced the windshield of the squad car, striking Officer Yap in the face.

As his fellow officers returned fire, Officer Yap now seriously wounded and visually impaired from the blood that was now streaming from his wound, stumbled from the passenger door of the vehicle, bravely stood his ground and fired at the suspect. Stumbling as he drew his service weapon, Officer Yap crouched behind the passenger door of the police vehicle. Moving to another position of cover from behind a telephone pole, Officer Yap knelt and continued defending his life and the lives of his fellow officers against the armed assailant.

Despite his valiant efforts to protect his partners, Officer Yap struggled to maintain consciousness. Eventually, he collapsed onto the parkway near the telephone pole.

His partners, fearing for his life came to his assistance, and were able to summon help for the downed Officer Yap.

Officer Rex Yap’s courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Yap is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.

 
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