home inside the lapd
 
INTERESTING FACTS

The City of Los Angeles is 468 square miles

The LAPD was established in 1869

The LAPD badge, motto, uniform and acronym are the Intellectual Property of the City of Los Angeles

 
 
I WANT TO KNOW
 
HOME
 
CRIME MAPPING
 
EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION
 
E-POLICING
 
JOIN THE TEAM
 
LAPD BLOG
 
LAPD EQUIPMENT
 
LAPD SPORTS
 
LAPD TV
 
NEWSROOM
 
OUR COMMUNITIES
 
POLICE COMMISSION
 
REPORT A CRIME
 
SOLVE A CRIME
 
SPECIAL ASSISTANT FOR CONSTITUTIONAL POLICING
 
SUPPORT LAPD
 
TRAFFIC
 
INSIDE THE LAPD

 
 
 
GET INFORMED
 
Alarm School
 
Contact Us
 
Crime Mapping and COMPSTAT
 
Crime Prevention
 
Domestic Violence
 
FAQs
 
For Your Family
 
Gang Injunctions
 
I Want to Know
 
LAPD General Fund Contracts
 
LAPD Adult Missing Persons Unit
 
Most Wanted
 
Read the Beat Magazine
 
Social Media
 
Sworn and Civilian Report
 
Trademark
 
Year in Review
 
Youth Programs

 

Disclaimer:
The LAPDonline.org® website has made reasonable efforts to provide an accurate translation. However, no automated or computerized translation is perfect and is not intended to replace human or traditional translation methods. The official text is the English version of the LAPDonline.org® website. If any questions arise concerning the accuracy of the information presented by the translated version of the website, please refer to the English edition of the website, which is the official version.

 
1998 Medal of Valor Recipients
 
 
Police Officer Don Anderson
Police Officer Tracey Angeles
Detective Vincent Bancroft, Jr.
Police Officer Edward Brentlinger
Police Officer Anthony Cabunoc
Police Officer John Caprarelli
Detective Thomas Culotta
Police Officer Edwin Dominguez
Police Officer Steven Gomez
Detective Kevin Harley Police Officer Richard Massa
Sergeant Israel Sonny Medina
Police Officer Charles Perriguey
Police Officer Todd Schmitz
Police Officer Conrado Torrez
Detective Lawrence Winston
Detective Phillip J. Wixon
Police Officer James Zboravan
Police Officer Richard Zielinski


Officer Anderson

Officer Don Anderson

On Friday, February 28, 1997, the Los Angeles Police Department experienced a day of terror and remarkable heroism. The North Hollywood Bank Shootout will long be remembered as one of the country's most shocking displays of criminal behavior and an outstanding example of professional, heroic law enforcement. On this day, two men in full body armor held up a bank and then proceeded to shower a North Hollywood community with hundreds of armor-piercing AK-47 rounds. Miraculously, of the 12 officers and eight civilian bystanders who were injured, none were killed. This amazing fact is attributable to the bravery and heroic actions, on that infamous day, of the men and women of the Los Angeles Police Department.

While training at the Police Academy, Officer Don Anderson was notified of a "SWAT Call Up" at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard and responded with other SWAT officers. Arriving at the designated Command Post and receiving limited information due to the urgency of the situation, they immediately moved in to attempt the rescue of wounded officers and citizens. The SWAT officers drove their police vehicle in the midst of gunfire and provided cover for an armored truck performing the rescue operation. After the successful rescue, the SWAT officers were directed by another officer towards a Jeep and a white vehicle in the middle of the street. Within three-to four-car lengths away, it was apparent that a second suspect was behind the wheel of the Jeep. Despite a tactical disadvantage, Officer Anderson drove the police vehicle closer while another officer began firing at the suspect, who was surprised with Officer Anderson's bold maneuver. Officer Anderson stopped the police vehicle, exited, and began to shoot at the suspect, who was showering the area with blasts of automatic gunfire. During this gun battle, which took place within a distance of 35 feet, Officer Anderson's weapon malfunctioned. Calmly, Officer Anderson cleared his weapon, and then placed himself in a prone position to observe the suspect's lower extremities. Fearing for the lives of his fellow officers, Officer Anderson fired at the armed gunman who slumped against the car. In the face of overwhelming danger Officer Anderson never quit his relentless pursuit to protect officers and citizens from violent felons who had utter disregard for human life.

Officer Don Anderson's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Anderson is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.



Detective Tracey Angeles

Detective Tracey Angeles and her partner responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. The plainclothes detectives and other officers deployed at the location. Detective Angeles observed the suspects exit the bank with assault rifles and randomly fire bursts of ammunition at civilians and officers in the area. In response, the officers fired on the suspects who returned the fire, pelting the area with gunfire. In the exchange of gunfire, Detective Angeles and an officer were wounded. Although injured and pinned down by gunfire, Detective Angeles remained near the seriously injured fallen officer to keep him calm and reassure him that help was on its way. Before a patrol car came to rescue them, she placed a tourniquet on the officer's seriously injured arm and assisted in placing him in the rear of the police vehicle. Detective Angeles knowingly placed herself directly in the suspects' line of fire with the sole intent of providing assistance and reassurance to a seriously wounded officer.

Detective Tracey Angeles' courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Detective Angeles is hereby acknowledged by awarding her the Medal of Valor.


bancroft.jpg (5446 bytes)

Detective Vincent Bancroft, Jr.

Detective Vincent Bancroft Jr., along with other officers, responded to an "Officer Needs Help" call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Upon arriving, Detective Bancroft sought cover, along with his partner, behind a wall adjacent to the bank. Detective Bancroft peered over the wall and observed an armed suspect emerge from the bank firing an automatic weapon at pinned down officers. In defense of the officers, Detective Bancroft shot at the gunman who returned fire. This deadly interaction continued several more times until the multiple bursts of rounds began to penetrate the wall, forcing Detective Bancroft and his fellow officers to redeploy to the police vehicle. Detective Bancroft then observed a white car stopped at an intersection and the armed suspect walking and spraying bursts of automatic gunfire. Suddenly, the driver suspect popped up from the white vehicle and began firing directly at Detective Bancroft. Detective Bancroft returned the fire and advanced toward the driver suspect. An exchange of gunfire ensued until the driver suspect suddenly accelerated the vehicle. Detective Bancroft reentered the police vehicle and continued to pursue the suspect who stopped and continued shooting through his rear window. Detective Bancroft exited his vehicle and deployed behind it where he observed that both suspects were immobilized. In total disregard for his own safety and in defense of others, Detective Bancroft repeatedly and aggressively exposed himself to imminent peril by relentlessly preventing the escape of these extremely dangerous suspects.

Detective Vincent Bancroft's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Detective Bancroft is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


brentlinger.jpg (5450 bytes)

Officer Edward Brentlinger

Officer Edward Brentlinger responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Upon arriving, he deployed behind a concrete wall at the bank parking lot. Suddenly, Officer Brentlinger observed a suspect randomly firing at officers and citizens. He heard outcries for help from officers who had been shot. In total disregard for his own safety, Officer Brentlinger left his own protective cover and fired at the suspect. This caused the suspect to return numerous rounds in Officer Brentlinger's direction. Again, Officer Brentlinger left his cover in defense of others and engaged the suspect resulting in further return fire. As Officer Brentlinger returned towards cover, he was struck by gunfire and by concrete fragments on his face and forearm. His prescription glasses were knocked off. Undaunted, Officer Brentlinger reloaded his weapon, left his cover, and for the third time, engaged the suspect. Officer Brentlinger observed the suspect move unaffected through the bullets and again move toward his position. In defense of his and nearby officers' lives, Officer Brentlinger once again engaged the suspect. Officer Brentlinger subsequently heard another officer shout that the suspect was down. Despite his injuries, Officer Brentlinger repeatedly and tenaciously confronted the heavily armed and armored suspect in defense of others.

Officer Edward Brentlinger's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Brentlinger is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


cabunoc.jpg (5519 bytes)

Officer Anthony Cabunoc

Officer Anthony Cabunoc and his partner responded to "Officers Down" and "Shots being Fired" calls at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Arriving at the scene and hearing reports of automatic gunfire, Officer Cabunoc observed two bullet-riddled police vehicles which appeared to be disabled. He also observed a wounded officer lying on the street against a white van peppered with bullet holes. Despite intermittent rounds being fired toward his location and in disregard for his own safety, Officer Cabunoc and his partner used the cover of parked vehicles to get to the wounded officer. Upon reaching him, it was obvious that the officer had sustained life threatening wounds, and that a detective near him had also been injured. Officer Cabunoc instructed his partner to retrieve a vehicle while he provided cover. Shortly, his partner returned with a patrol car. Amidst gunfire, Officer Cabunoc effected an officer down rescue by hoisting the seriously injured officer around the waist and falling into the back seat of the patrol car with the officer on top of him. The injured detective moved into the front seat, while Officer Cabunoc's partner reversed out of the line of fire. After transporting the wounded officers to paramedics, Officer Cabunoc again returned to the line of fire to aid other nearby injured officers. Officer Cabunoc knowingly placed himself in imminent peril by initiating and effecting a successful, heroic rescue of wounded officers who were pinned down within the suspect's field of fire.

Officer Anthony Cabunoc's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Cabunoc is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


capraretti.jpg (5520 bytes)

Officer John Caprarelli

Officer Caprarelli responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Officer Caprarelli deployed to a nearby street where he observed a moving white vehicle with the trunk open, which he surmised belonged to the suspects. Moving closer, he observed one armed suspect crouched near a trailer firing indiscriminately at pinned down officers. In defense of the officers, Officer Caprarelli fired at the suspect, who redirected fire at Officer Caprarelli. Officer Caprarelli retreated behind parked vehicles, and observed a plainclothes detective detail approaching in an unmarked vehicle.

Officer Caprarelli immediately left his position of cover to warn the detectives. He then took cover behind a utility pole where he observed the crouched suspect move and begin walking toward an adjacent parkway. A gun battle ensued and as Officer Caprarelli was reloading, the suspect began firing a semi-automatic handgun at him. Officer Caprarelli dove for cover behind a parked vehicle while the suspect relentlessly continued firing at him. Again, Officer Caprarelli fired at the gunman who subsequently fell to the ground and was apprehended. Officer Caprarelli had knowingly exposed himself to imminent peril several times to engage the suspect in defense of others' lives. In the face of overwhelming danger, and in total disregard for his own safety, he tenaciously pursued dangerous suspects until their danger to the public had been neutralized.

Officer John Caprarelli's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Caprarelli is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


culott.jpg (5714 bytes)

Detective Thomas Culotta

Detective Thomas Culotta, along with two other officers, responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. He deployed behind a concrete wall at the bank parking lot. As the sound of gunfire resonated through the area, Detective Culotta observed officers being hit, building windows being shattered, and parked cars being pierced by a barrage of bullets. He also observed the suspect spray bursts of automatic gunfire at officers and civilians as he advanced toward Detective Culotta's position. In defense of fellow officers and unarmed civilian bystanders, Detective Culotta fired at the armed suspect. Unfazed by the bullets due to his heavy, full body armor, the suspect calmly reloaded and began firing directly at Detective Culotta. The heated gun battle between the suspect and Detective Culotta continued. As the suspect continued to advance towards him, Detective Culotta moved to the cover of a nearby parked vehicle. In total disregard for his own safety and in defense of his fellow officers, Detective Culotta fired a third time at the suspect. The suspect subsequently fell to the ground and was taken into custody.

Detective Thomas Culotta's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Detective Culotta is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


dominguez.jpg (5944 bytes)

Officer Edwin Dominguez

From the parking lot of the North Hollywood Station, Officer Edwin Dominguez heard the radio broadcast of "Officer Needs Help" at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. He deployed to a nearby street where he observed several citizens standing in the open, subject to serious injury. Without hesitation, Officer Dominguez left his position of cover and directed the citizens to return to their homes. Officer Dominguez then observed a suspect armed with an assault rifle who was actively engaged in a gun battle with other officers. He proceeded toward the gun battle while noticing that vehicular traffic was heading into extremely dangerous conditions. Fearing for the well-being of the drivers, Officer Dominguez deployed to the intersection, without cover, and redirected the traffic to safety. He then observed the suspect firing several rounds, and believing that the gunfire was aimed at officers and citizens, Officer Dominguez engaged the suspect, who returned fire directly at Officer Dominguez. Officer Dominguez sought cover behind a nearby fence, heard the sound of automatic gunfire and saw another suspect shooting from a white vehicle. While keeping sight of the vehicle, Officer Dominguez joined two detectives in an unmarked vehicle and followed the suspect. Officer Dominguez then observed the suspect leave the white vehicle and attempt to commandeer a truck from a citizen. Officer Dominguez exited the police vehicle and engaged the dangerous criminal in gunfire. After the suspect fell to the ground, Officer Dominguez assisted in securing the scene.

Officer Edwin Dominguez' courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Dominguez is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


gomez.jpg (5815 bytes)

Officer Steven Gomez

While training at the Police Academy, Officer Steve Gomez was notified of a "SWAT Call Up" at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard and responded with other SWAT officers. Arriving at the designated Command Post and receiving limited information due to the urgency of the situation, they immediately moved in to attempt the rescue of wounded officers and citizens. The SWAT officers drove their police vehicle in the midst of gunfire and provided cover for an armored truck performing the rescue operation. After the successful rescue, the SWAT officers were directed by another officer towards a Jeep and a white vehicle in the middle of the street. Within three-to four-car lengths away, it was apparent that a second suspect was behind the wheel of the Jeep. Suddenly, Officer Gomez observed the suspect with an assault rifle. Realizing that the suspect intended to shoot the officers, Officer Gomez engaged the gunman, allowing his partners time to exit the police vehicle, which by now was within 35 feet of the gunman's bursts of automatic gunfire. As the gun battle ensued, Officer Gomez propelled himself out of the vehicle and assumed a prone position to observe the suspect's lower extremities. Fearing for the lives of his fellow officers, Officer Gomez fired at the armed suspect who slumped against the car. In the face of overwhelming danger, Officer Gomez never quit his relentless pursuit to protect his fellow officers and to ensure the safety of the community.

Officer Steven Gomez' courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Gomez is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


harley.jpg (5629 bytes)

Detective Kevin Harley

Detective Kevin Harley and three other officers responded to an "Officer Needs Help" call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Upon arriving and deploying himself behind a wall, Detective Harley observed a walking suspect firing an automatic weapon at pinned down officers. In defense of the officers, Detective Harley fired at the suspect and a gun battle ensued between the two. During the exchange of gunfire, Detective Harley observed a white vehicle leaving which was reported as belonging to the suspects. Detective Harley and other officers went in pursuit in their police vehicle. Detective Harley also observed the walking suspect firing his automatic rifle at officers in the area. When the driver suspect suddenly accelerated, the detectives followed him. Amidst the sounds of automatic gunfire, Detective Harley exited the police vehicle and took cover behind a parked vehicle. A short time later, he was informed that the driver suspect had been immobilized. In total disregard for his own safety, and in defense of others, Detective Harley aggressively and repeatedly exposed himself to imminent peril by relentlessly preventing the escape of these extremely dangerous and heavily armed suspects.

Detective Kevin Harley's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Detective Harley is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


massa.jpg (5757 bytes)

Officer Richard Massa

While training at the Police Academy, Officer Richard Massa was notified of a "SWAT Call Up" at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard and responded with other SWAT officers. Arriving at the designated Command Post and receiving limited information due to the urgency of the situation, they immediately moved in to attempt the rescue of wounded officers and citizens. The SWAT officers drove their police vehicle in the midst of gunfire and provided cover for an armored truck performing the rescue operation. After the successful rescue, the SWAT officers were directed by other officer towards a Jeep and a white vehicle in the middle of the street. Within three-to-four car lengths away, Officer Massa observed that the suspect was behind the wheel of the Jeep. Suddenly, Officer Massa observed the heavily armed suspect exit the driver's side as officers exchanged gunfire with him. Officer Massa, along with another officer, exited the vehicle while the remaining officer continued to engage the suspect. Officer Massa then engaged the suspect in an intense, close range gun battle. During this battle, Officer Massa heard his fellow officer yell that his weapon had malfunctioned. Officer Massa immediately provided cover by engaging the suspect again, who continued to spray the area with automatic gunfire. During the incident, Officer Massa reloaded and retrieved extra magazines from the police vehicle. Officer Massa then assumed a prone position to fire at the suspect's feet in an attempt to neutralize him. Shortly thereafter, Officer Massa heard a fellow officer shout that the suspect had been immobilized. In the face of overwhelming danger, Officer Massa never quit in the relentless pursuit to protect his fellow officers and citizens from violent felons who had utter disregard for human life.

Officer Richard Massa's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Massa is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


medina.jpg (5645 bytes)

Sergeant Israel Sonny Medina

Sergeant Israel Sonny Medina responded to an "Officer Needs Help" call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Sergeant Medina arrived and observed a white vehicle traveling slowly away from of him. The suspect driver then stopped the white vehicle adjacent to a Jeep, got out, stood between the two vehicles, and fired a burst of automatic gunfire in Sergeant Medina's direction. Sergeant Medina exited his police vehicle and took cover behind a parked vehicle. The suspect re-entered the Jeep and began firing his weapon at the SWAT officers who were approaching in their police vehicle. Sergeant Medina, believing the officers would be unable to exit the vehicle due to the suspect's automatic gunfire, and in total disregard for his own safety, engaged the suspect. The suspect and the SWAT officers engaged in a furious gunfight while Sergeant Medina advanced to another position to obtain a better angle from which to fire at the suspect. Sergeant Medina engaged the suspect, who attempted to move along the passenger side of his vehicle to evade the gunfire. Sergeant Medina and several other officers redeployed and fired at the suspect, effectively restricting him from further movement. Sergeant Medina knowingly responded to an extremely dangerous situation where citizens and officers had already been shot. He engaged and advanced on the suspect, despite the danger to himself, in defense of the lives of others.

Sergeant Israel Sonny Medina's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Sergeant Medina is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


perriguey.jpg (5568 bytes)

Officer Charles Perriguey

While assigned to Air Unit 8, Air Support Division Pilot Officer Charles Perriguey and his partner responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Officer Perriguey observed two heavily armed gunmen shooting at police officers and citizens. The gunmen fired in excess of 150 rounds upward at the orbiting helicopter. Officer Perriguey manipulated his aircraft, constantly changing altitude, course and speed in an attempt to avoid the gunfire. Officer Perriguey was also forced to maneuver around numerous media helicopters, which forced him to take immediate evasive action to avoid a midair collision. In addition, knowing that this incident was occurring within the flight path of the Burbank Airport, Officer Perriguey had the presence of mind to notify the Burbank Tower to keep civilian aircraft out of the area. The selfless acts of courage and clear presence of mind demonstrated by Officer Perriguey throughout this extremely dangerous situation were instrumental in overcoming the superior firepower of the suspects and clearly contributed to the preservation of the lives of involved officers and civilians alike.

Officer Charles Perriguey's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Perriguey is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


schmitz.jpg (5715 bytes)

Officer Todd Schmitz

Officer Todd Schmitz and his partner responded to "Officers Down" and "Shots being Fired" calls at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Arriving at the scene and hearing reports of automatic gunfire, Officer Schmitz observed two bullet-riddled police vehicles which appeared to be disabled. He also observed a wounded officer lying on the street against a white van peppered with bullet holes. Despite intermittent rounds being fired toward his location and in disregard for his own safety, Officer Schmitz and his partner used the cover of parked vehicles to get to the wounded officer. Upon reaching him, it was obvious that the officer had sustained life threatening wounds, and that a detective near him had also been injured. Under a shower of bullets, Officer Schmitz ran behind the cover of parked vehicles to reach a usable police vehicle and immediately drove it back into the line of fire where his fellow officers lay wounded. Officer Schmitz then assisted the injured officers into the vehicle, and then drove it in reverse out of the line of fire to waiting paramedics. Officer Schmitz again returned to the line of fire to aid other nearby injured officers. Officer Schmitz knowingly placed himself in imminent peril by initiating and effecting a successful, heroic rescue of wounded officers who were pinned down within the suspect's field of fire.

Officer Todd Schmitz' courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Schmitz is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


torrez.jpg (5938 bytes)

Officer Conrado Torrez

Officer Conrado Torrez, along with two detectives, responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Crouched behind a police vehicle, Officer Torrez observed civilians running for cover, officers deployed behind their vehicles, and two suspects randomly firing automatic weapons. Officer Torrez engaged the suspects, who immediately returned fire directly at him. Officer Torrez, not realizing he had sustained a gunshot wound, redeployed and observed one of the suspects in a vehicle firing his automatic weapon at officers deployed in the area. Officer Torrez engaged the driving suspect, who rapidly accelerated his vehicle. The other suspect was now firing from a parkway at his fellow officers. Officer Torrez shot at the walking suspect, causing him to abandon his rifle and draw a semi-automatic pistol. Officer Torrez reloaded and observed that the suspect was immobilized. Officer Torrez then turned his attention back to the driver suspect who was still firing his weapon. Officer Torrez ran two blocks and redeployed with a police vehicle in pursuit of the suspect. Suddenly, Officer Torrez observed the suspect exit his vehicle and attempt to commandeer a Jeep. Officer Torrez shot at the suspect who returned fire, shattering the window of the police vehicle. Officer Torrez quickly rolled beneath his vehicle and returned fire at the suspect. He then observed that the suspect was down and being taken into custody. Despite being wounded, and in total disregard for his own safety, Officer Torrez repeatedly and aggressively pursued both suspects despite imminent peril to himself in defense of others.

Officer Conrado Torrez' courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Torrez is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


zboravan.jpg (5525 bytes)

Officer James Zboravan

Officer James Zboravan, and his partner responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. The officers deployed, along with two plainclothes detectives, at the location. Officer Zboravan noted that neither detective was wearing a ballistic vest. Suddenly, the suspects exited the bank with automatic assault rifles, firing bursts of ammunition at civilians and officers. One suspect immediately turned his gunfire toward the officers. In an attempt to shield one of the detectives from the fire, Officer Zboravan laid on top of the detective using his ballistic vest as a shield for both the detective and himself. In total disregard for his own safety, Officer Zboravan knowingly used his own body to shield another officer from automatic gunfire. During this heroic effort, Officer Zboravan sustained two gunshot wounds. He advised others that he was hit and that he was unable to move. Aided by a fellow officer, Officer Zboravan made his way to the protection of a nearby dental office.

Officer James Zboravan's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Zboravan is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


zielinski.jpg (5813 bytes)

Officer Richard Zielinski

Motor Officer Richard Zielinski responded to an "Officer Needs Help" radio call at the Bank of America located at 6600 Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Upon arrival, as Officer Zielinski prepared to assist injured civilians and officers, he observed a suspect walking slowly near the bank and firing an automatic weapon indiscriminately at officers who were precariously close to the gunman. In fear of the officers' lives, Officer Zielinski engaged the suspect, who immediately crouched behind a vehicle. When the suspect stood, Officer Zielinski engaged him a second time. The gun battle continued for several minutes with the suspect being hit, yet completely unfazed due to his heavy armor. Officer Zielinski redeployed and after a heavy exchange of gunfire observed a wounded officer pinned down by the heavy gunfire. In an effort to distract the suspect and allow the officer time to move to a safer location, Officer Zielinski again shot at the suspect who immediately returned fire. As the wounded officer redeployed, Officer Zielinski reloaded and continued firing at the suspect in defense of the officers who were in the suspect's line of fire. Officer Zielinski also assisted a second wounded officer by pulling him behind a tree. Officer Zielinski, in total disregard for his own safety, repeatedly exposed himself to imminent danger of serious injury or death in defense of others during his confrontation with an armed suspect.

Officer Richard Zielinski's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Officer Zielinski is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.


winston.jpg (6268 bytes)

Detective Lawrence Winston

On the evening of June 26, 1995, Detective Lawrence Winston and his partners were on an extended surveillance for two suspects believed to have committed over 40 violent robberies in the San Fernando Valley. During their surveillance, the detectives observed the suspects commit an armed robbery of a liquor store.

The detectives decided to take the suspects into custody when the suspects returned to their parked vehicle. As the suspects entered their car, the SIS detectives moved into position. Suddenly, one of the suspects stood up through the open sunroof and fired at the detectives. Deploying behind the door of his police vehicle, Detective Winston engaged the suspect. As he paused to assess the effects of his rounds, Detective Winston noticed that the armed suspect had retreated inside his car but was still firing. During the exchange of gunfire, his partner had been hit and Detective Winston recognized the need to draw fire away from him. Without hesitation, Detective Winston exposed himself to the gunfire and ran for cover approximately 20 feet away. As he fired at the suspects, Detective Winston was shot in the lower abdomen and fell to the ground. As he lay wounded, the suspects continued their fire. Though seriously wounded, Detective Winston, in total disregard for his own safety, continued to engage one of the suspects in defense of his partner. He then observed his wounded partner move into the roadway and fire at the suspects. One suspect expired at the scene from his wounds. The other suspect stood trial and is now serving several life sentences in prison.

Detective Lawrence Winston's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Detective Winston is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.




Detective Phillip J. Wixon

The detectives decided to take the suspects into custody when the suspects returned to their parked vehicle. As the suspects entered their car, the SIS detectives moved into position. Suddenly, one of the suspects stood up through the open sunroof and fired at the detectives. As Detective Wixon exited his police vehicle, he was struck by one of the rounds which penetrated his ballistic vest and entered his abdomen. Realizing he was shot, Detective Wixon struggled to maintain visual contact with the suspect. Gaining his composure, Detective Wixon again fired several rounds at the armed suspect. A gun battle ensued and Detective Wixon heard his partner shout that he was shot and was down. Simultaneously, Detective Wixon heard the suspects' vehicle revving. Concerned that his partner would be crushed, the injured Detective Wixon, in total disregard for his own safety and in defense of his partner, exposed himself to the gunfire and stepped into the roadway away from his cover to gain a better tactical angle on the suspects. The suspects' vehicle then lurched rearward into the police vehicle. Detective Wixon fired on the driver suspect and held his weapon on the passenger suspect until other SIS detectives took the suspects into custody. One suspect expired at the scene from his wounds. The other suspect stood trial and is now serving several life sentences in prison.

Detective Phillip Wixon's courage, discipline and presence of mind embody the finest traditions of the Los Angeles Police Department. Detective Wixon is hereby acknowledged by awarding him the Medal of Valor.

 
contact us  /  terms & conditions  /  los angeles police foundation
 
+ Powered By Radar Blue | © 2014 City of Los Angeles
 
Los Angeles Police Foundation Los Angeles Police Foundation