Downtown Los Angeles header image
Los Angeles Police Department Badge


News Release

Monday, July 2, 2012

Media Relations

Suspect Injured While Resisting Arrest NR12309rf

Los Angeles:  Recently, Los Angeles Police Department Hollywood Division officers encountered and attempted to arrest a violent battery suspect; during the confrontation, the suspect was injured.

On April 30, 2012, around 6:30 p.m., two officers on patrol, Police Officer I Kyle Carrillo and Police Officer II Aaron Green, received a radio call about a battery suspect behind a market in the 7200 block of Sunset Boulevard.  The suspect, later identified as Gregory Allen Nep, was yelling at the officers, clenching his fists, frothing at the mouth and taunting them to “shoot him in the face.” He also advanced toward one of the officers, at which time the officer shot at him with a Taser. However, the shot was ineffective because one of the darts missed him.  Officer Carrillo then tried to kick Nep in the abdomen, and that too had no effect on his aggressive behavior.

Finally, joined by a third officer as backup, Police Officer II Jose Lopez, the officers used their batons, body weight, knees and elbows to subdue the suspect enough to handcuff him and hobble his ankles.  Later, Nep was taken to a local hospital and treated for cuts and bruises related to the officers’ use of force.  The next day, he was released from the hospital and was in the process of being booked at the Department’s Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) when MDC medical staff noticed his blood pressure was very low.  Consequently, Los Angeles Fire Department personnel took him to a local hospital where he was admitted for a shattered spleen.

No officers were injured during the incident and the Department’s Force Investigation Division is conducting a full investigation.

The investigation will ultimately be reviewed by the Chief of Police, the Office of the Inspector General and Board of Police Commissioners for compliance with the Department’s use-of-force policy which states that an officer’s use-of-force actions must be objectively reasonable.