LAPD SubHeaders 06
inside the lapd art theft detail crime prevention tips
 
I WANT TO KNOW
 
HOME
spacer
 
CRIME MAPPING
 
EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION
 
E-POLICING
 
JOIN THE TEAM
spacer
 
LAPD BLOG
 
LAPD EQUIPMENT
 
LAPD SPORTS
 
LAPD TV
 
NEWSROOM
 
OUR COMMUNITIES
 
POLICE COMMISSION
 
REPORT A CRIME
 
SOLVE A CRIME
 
SPECIAL ASSISTANT FOR CONSTITUTIONAL POLICING
 
SUPPORT LAPD
 
TRAFFIC
spacer spacer
 
INSIDE THE LAPD
LAPD2
 
 
spacer spacer
 
GET INFORMED
spacer spacer
 
Alarm School
spacer spacer
 
Contact Us
spacer spacer
 
Crime Mapping and COMPSTAT
spacer spacer
 
Crime Prevention
spacer spacer
 
Domestic Violence
spacer spacer
 
FAQs
spacer spacer
 
For Your Family
spacer spacer
 
Gang Injunctions
spacer spacer
 
I Want to Know
spacer spacer
 
LAPD General Fund Contracts
spacer spacer
 
LAPD Adult Missing Persons Unit
spacer spacer
 
Most Wanted
spacer spacer
 
Read the Beat Magazine
spacer spacer
 
Social Media
spacer spacer
 
Sworn and Civilian Report
spacer spacer
 
Trademark
spacer spacer
 
Year in Review
spacer spacer
 
Youth Programs

translation logo: globe with lapd badge
 

Disclaimer:
The LAPDonline.org® website has made reasonable efforts to provide an accurate translation. However, no automated or computerized translation is perfect and is not intended to replace human or traditional translation methods. The official text is the English version of the LAPDonline.org® website. If any questions arise concerning the accuracy of the information presented by the translated version of the website, please refer to the English edition of the website, which is the official version.

 
Art is One of the Best Types of Property to Recover
 
 
Many people believe that when art is stolen, the chances of recovery are remote – that it falls into a black hole, never to emerge again.  That has not been the experience of the Art Theft Detail.  On the contrary, art is one of the best types of property to ultimately recover.

Law enforcement agencies typically have two main categories of stolen property reported to them.  Both become more difficult to recover as time goes by.  One category involves property that eventually becomes obsolete.  Who is still looking for a computer or a television or clothing stolen ten years ago?  These items deteriorate in value to the point where they become worthless.  Victims soon go to the local department store where they can purchase the new and improved model of the same thing.

The other category is property that may be distinctive and high value, but can be disguised.  So, even if the item is encountered, it is not recognized.  A distinctive diamond bracelet can be melted down for its gold and the stones removed to fashion an entirely new piece of jewelry.  A luxury car can have parts replaced and the vehicle identification number altered.  With a new paint job, fraudulent paperwork, and new plates, the car can assume an entirely new identity to the point where a victim will not recognize his own car.

However, stolen art will have a tendency to appreciate in value and stay relatively unchanged.  Ten years from now, an Andy Warhol will still be an Andy Warhol.  It may have a new frame and need cleaning but the artwork cannot be easily disguised or altered without having an adverse effect on its value.  A thief isn’t going to remove the artist’s signature and replace it with an alias.  Art has intrinsic value for what it is.  Therefore, art and other distinctive cultural and historical property are recoverable if we put in place the tools to locate and identify these items when they eventually surface.

 
contact us  /  terms & conditions  /  los angeles police foundation
 
+ Powered By Radar Blue | © 2014 City of Los Angeles
 
Los Angeles Police Foundation Los Angeles Police Foundation